Evidence on Trial

The way evidence is presented can make all the difference for the accused and the victims. How does this processing of evidence affect trials? Swiss-Canadian forensic architect Susan Schuppli went through the archives of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to find out.

Trials could take longer if all evidence, footage, documents, transcripts and statements were presented in their entirety. Prosecutors and defending lawyers would spend countless more hours sifting through the material to build their case for guilt or innocence.

Does this processing of evidence affect trials? What happens when physical evidence is processed in the judicial apparatus of an international criminal court? What happens when visual and audio recording and other non-written documents are used as physical evidence in a criminal trial – when it becomes a testimonial for future generations?

Swiss-Canadian forensic architect Susan Schuppli went through the archives of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to find these answers. Her project, Evidence on Trial, presented pieces from the Archives of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The Hague Institute welcomed her to discuss her findings in a panel discussion.

  • Susan Schuppli
    international criminal law researcher
  • Jill Coster van Voorhout
    Researcher, The Hague Institute
  • Dan Saxon
    Assistant Professor of International Law, Leiden University College
    and former Prosecutor of the ICTY

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